April Project of the Month – Card Making

This month I have been experimenting with different card making techniques and trying to “up my game”.

First up I made this tool box using Lawn Fawn Scalloped Edge Pop Up card die set.  This set is fantastic!  I am so glad I splurged on it.  I can see using it in many different variations.  Here I loaded up the box with tools from Stampin’ Up Nailed It stamp and die bundle.  I cut the tools out of yellow card stock with foil tape that I adhered for the metal parts of the tools.  I stamped on the yellow card stock first, adhered the foil tape (bought at Home Goods – I think it is for dryer vents or something) and re-stamped the image. (Hint:  I found I needed to use StazOn Ink to keep the image from smearing.  The banner poles come with the pop up box kit and I improvised the banner with my Stampin’ Up Thoughtful Banners sentiment and coordinating punch.

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Next I CASE’d a few cards that I admired on Pinterest.  The first (inspired by Christy Velasquez – hers used a beautiful blended rainbow background) was die cut on my Silhouette Cameo and mounted on a lime green card base.  I used Avery Elle Double Pierced Rectangle Dies to make the frame.  I triple cut the hello from black cardstock backed with double sided adhesive.

The second card (inspired by Barbara Anders) used the Hero Arts Grateful Leaves layering stamp set and coordinating die.  I stamped the leaf on white cardstock in 3 background colors, stamped again with the black veins and cut and mounted each leaf on a wood embossed white background with foam tape.  I added some gold thread behind the leaves but I admit that the “random” loops of thread are not my forte.  I white heat embossed my sentiment (from Hero Arts Anyone Can Stamp) on black cardstock.  I added coordinating hearts, stars and dots from Stampin’Up.  I really liked how this card turned out!

The next two cards used techniques from Jennifer McGuire.  The sunshine card used a technique she called floating die technique.   Basically I cut the flower using Stampin’ Up Timeless Tags die in green, turquoise and yellow.  I backed the turquoise with double sided tape which made it easier.  I set the cut pieces on my card in one piece and remove all the pieces I didn’t want except the outline.  I added the center in yellow, and the leaves in green and then removed the outline.  The flower appears to be floating.  Again I triple cut the sunshine (from Stampin’Up) on black card stock and layered on the card front.  The rectangle was die cut with the Avery Elle Double Pierced Rectangle Die.  If I tried this technique again I think I would try it with a different die with larger pieces but overall I was happy with the result.

The small (3×3) heart thank you note used Jennifer’s spotlight stamp technique.  This was super simple.  I stamped my card base with the Avery Elle Big Greetings Thank You.  I also stamped some scrap turquoise card stock with the same sentiment.  I punched out the heart and mounted it over the cardstock with dimensionals making sure to line up the sentiment.  I threw on a few water drops from Pretty Pink Posh and done.  Big impact for very little effort.  This technique definitely bears repeating.  Thank you Jennifer McGuire.

Lastly are two cards I made just for fun.  The first one was for my niece who shares my love of succulents.  The Cactus is from Hampton Arts which I tried to color with my Tombow brush pens and the succulents are Spellbinders dies – all from Michael’s.  Proving you don’t need to invest a lot of money to make fun cards (although that hasn’t stopped me).

The small (3 x 3 again) thank you note is printed with my Misti using a layering tulip stamp set from Altenew and Hampton Art Flower Amaze Thank You.

I really need to find a third hobby (my first love is jewelry making and my etsy shop – bydeezyne.etsy.com) because I am running out of card supply storage!

 

 

 

September Project of the Month – Brush Lettering

This month I have been trying to learn brush lettering and thought I would share what I have learned so far.

brush-lettering

bydeezyne

Tools of the Trade:  There are tons of brush options out there from actual water color brushes, to Crayola markers, to Tombow brush pens and the like.  I think the Crayola markers are a great way to start.  They are cheap and easy to use.  After struggling for a month with a Prismacolor brush pen I finally bought a cheap set of Crayola markers and the brush lettering started to click (below).  I then “graduated” to a set of Tombow dual brush pens that worked relatively well (above).

crayola-markers

I just received an order of Tombow Fudenosuke Brush Pens that everyone on Instagram seems to swear by and I’m looking forward to experimenting with them (the big drawback with them is that they aren’t available locally so I had to order them online).  It looks like the Fudenosuke Brush Pen may be between the Crayola markers and the dual brush pens in terms of hardness and difficulty of use.  I tried a watercolor brush with watercolors briefly but that seemed to add an unnecessary degree of difficulty.  I think you really need to master the techniques first before trying that and I’m not there yet.

fudensuke

Scale:  I had a tough time with scale and I think scale is definitely linked to size and type of pen.  Initially I think I was trying to write too small.  With the Tombow brush pens and the Crayola markers 3/4 inch seems to be the right size between base line and x line (bottom and top of most lower case letters).  The new Fudenosuke Brush Pen have a smaller tip which allows a smaller scale (1/4 – 1/2″).

Slant:  I don’t typically slant my writing at all in my day to day life, but for some reason slanting the letters seemed to work better for me.  It was also helpful to slant my paper about 45 degrees (or maybe more) to the front of my desk to write.  Initially I was doing my writing on a pad on my lap which is not a great way to learn.

Embellish your lettering:  These embellishments can add enough zing to your lettering to compensate for a less than perfect script.

Shadows:  I use either a gray Tombow brush marker or a Faber Design Art Marker (and even the gray Crayola) to shade below and to the right of all the letters.  The Tombow is more subtle but it can also “bleed” if it gets too close to the lettering.

Multi tone letters:  Lots of ways to do this but my favorite is relettering the bottom part of each letter in a second color.  You do this by putting a piece of cardstock over the part you do not want to color and relettering.

Highlights:  I put some highlights on my letters with a white gel pen (Mitsubishi Pencil company Signo White Pigment Ink) that I had laying around.

I’m a long way from perfect but it is fun to practice and try new techniques and pens. try-try-again